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How A Tarp is Made

Just about all tarps, regardless of their finished sizes, start off on a roll from mills in the US or manufacturers overseas. Typically tarp rolls are between 60”-72” wide and about 100 yards long, although you will certainly find tarp rolls of other varying widths and lengths. 



Once tarp rolls are brought to the plant, fabric panels are measured and cut from the rolls. If the width of the finished tarp is wider than the width of the roll fabric, tarp panels need to be joined together to meet the desired dimensions. Most synthetic tarp materials, such as polyethylene and vinyl, are joined together by heat sealing. Natural materials, such as canvas, are sewn together. 



Once you have reached the desired dimensions in length and width from joining together the fabric panels, the edges of the tarps are folded over and hemmed in for reinforcement. This is where you will lose a few inches in the Finished Size of tarp from the fabric previously taken off the roll. Most hemmed tarps proceed to be set with grommets, the circular eyelets that you commonly find evenly spaced around the perimeter of tarps. 


After the edges are hemmed and the grommets are inserted, the tarp is ready for use. It is folded and packed to be shipped!

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