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Top 10 Tarps and Covers for Weather Protection

1. Vinyl Tarps are the strongest, most waterproof tarps available. Vinyl tarps are great for all seasons, withstanding both UV light and bitter cold superbly well. Vinyl tarps are long-lasting covers suited for use on just about everything from cars to roofs to machinery. Vinyl tarps also come in different grades and many colors. Keep a vinyl tarp handy, and you can use it for protection season after season.

Vinyl Tarp




2. Polyester Canvas Tarps are breathable yet water resistant. Tarp Supply's Ultrastrong Canvas Tarps are the best covers for deterring condensation buildup underneath yet helping to keep your items dry. Polyester Canvas, unlike some treated canvas tarps, leaves behind NO dye or NO residue.

Ultrastrong Polyester Canvas

3. Poly Tarps are good all-purpose tarps that range from light duty to super heavy duty. Poly tarps are economical temporary covers. You will commonly see blue poly tarps being used, but there are stronger poly tarps in other colors that are available. Popular selections include heavy duty silver and silver/black poly tarps and super duty USA Made Poly Tarps.

Super Duty Silver Poly Tarp

4. Mesh Tarps, or shade tarps, are great windbreakers that also allow for air circulation. Mesh tarps feature an open weave that resembles a net. Look for strong vinyl coated mesh tarps that last you through the seasons. Great for nurseries, fences, shading, and dump trucks.

55% Vinyl Multimesh Tarp
5. Make sure you have Fire Retardant tarps if you are setting up a structure in public areas or will be working close to flame or a heat source. Always verify that the fire retardant tarps you are working with meet your state and local fire marshal requirements.
Fire Retardant Salvage Cover

Look for Top 10 Covers and Tarps Part II in the next post to come!

Comments

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